Tips to get your children back to school ready with proper sleep

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Columbia, SC (WOLO) —

According to Prisma Health studies show that insufficient sleep is connected with lower academic achievement, as well as higher rates of  being out absent and tardiness.

Trey Brown, M.D. Central South Carolina’s only physician with subspecialty training in both pediatric pulmonology and pediatric sleep medicine says,

“It is important to establish a good bedtime and sleep routine, with the child going to bed at the same time every night,

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently endorsed these guidelines recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Below are age groups and the best way to get them ready to back on a schedule that suits there age range.

  • Infants four months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children one to two years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children three to five years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children six to 12 years of age should sleep 9 to 12 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep 8 to 10 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.

In addition to these recommendations, the AAP suggests that all screens including TV, Computers and other devices be turned off 30 minutes before bedtime. and that TV, computers and not be allowed in children’s bedrooms.

The approach is a little differnt for infants and young children, when putting together a bedtime routine it’s important to ensure children get adequate sleep each night.

Sleep problems are common in children, with 25-50 percent of all children experiencing some type of sleep issues.

Officials say problems can range from short-term difficulties in falling asleep and night waking, to more serious primary sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea. If you have concerns, contact your child’s primary care physician.

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